AnsibleFest Atlanta 2019 Trip Report

Background: I started using Ansible in 2014 at a datacenter company. I implemented Ansible to deploy our customer portal, which contained hundreds of war files, load balancer changes, database schema changes, etc. I’ve used Ansible at every position since. I joined Red Hat as part of the Ansible team in June 2018. I moved over to the OpenShift team in June 2019. I’m a long time Ansible user, advocate, and fan. [Read More]

Joining forces with OpenShift

This Monday (2019-08-19) will be my first day as Principal Technical Marketing Manager on the Cloud Platforms team at Red Hat. What does that mean? OpenShift (a lot of OpenShift), Kubernetes, containers, Operators, and all the associated bits will be my day job. Helping folks help themselves with technology is still and always will be the name of my game. But, working full time in the Kubernetes or cloud native ecosystem was a 2020 goal. [Read More]

Building Kubernetes Operators in an Ansible-native way

If you’d like discuss having me speak at your conference, Meetup, office, party, dinner, luncheon, podcast, etc. please use the CNCF speaker contact form. Thanks! Learn how Ansible can help developers (or any systems savvy person) quickly ramp up to build Operators to automate and manage the life cycle of complex Kubernetes applications. Elevator Pitch Operators simplify management of complex applications on Kubernetes. They are usually written in Go and require expertise with the internals of Kubernetes, but there’s an alternative to that with a lower barrier to entry for all. [Read More]

How to Teach Old Apps New Tricks with Ansible-based Operators (Parts 1 & 2)

At Red Hat Summit this year, I had the task of explaining Kubernetes Operators with Ansible in two, fifteen-minute talks, separated by three hours, in the middle of the busy Red Hat booth to anyone that walked up. I had to explain Kubernetes, the difference stateful and stateless apps, what a Kubernetes Operator is, how to write an operator with Ansible, and then demonstrate this capability. Use of video and sound was discouraged. [Read More]