PodCTL Co-host

Three years ago, I sat down with Brian Gracely and Josh Atwell and recorded a podcast. I hadn’t met Brian before that, but it was obvious Brian knew what he was doing hosting a podcast. I walked into a conference with Brian, Josh, four mics, a TASCAM, and a laptop. This was a legit podcast production I was sitting down to record. Sign up for DevOps'ish! DevOps'ish is a weekly newsletter covering DevOps, Cloud Native, Open Source, and the 'ish between. [Read More]

Joining forces with OpenShift

This Monday (2019-08-19) will be my first day as Principal Technical Marketing Manager on the Cloud Platforms team at Red Hat. What does that mean? OpenShift (a lot of OpenShift), Kubernetes, containers, Operators, and all the associated bits will be my day job. Helping folks help themselves with technology is still and always will be the name of my game. But, working full time in the Kubernetes or cloud native ecosystem was a 2020 goal. [Read More]

How to Teach Old Apps New Tricks with Ansible-based Operators (Parts 1 & 2)

At Red Hat Summit this year, I had the task of explaining Kubernetes Operators with Ansible in two, fifteen-minute talks, separated by three hours, in the middle of the busy Red Hat booth to anyone that walked up. I had to explain Kubernetes, the difference stateful and stateless apps, what a Kubernetes Operator is, how to write an operator with Ansible, and then demonstrate this capability. Use of video and sound was discouraged. [Read More]

The Secret to Kubernetes Secrets

I made an innocent comment on Twitter last week that led to WAY more feedback than I was expecting. The Kubernetes community showed me there are a lot of options when creating Kubernetes Secrets. I made the statement: Every single time I have to create a secret, I have to read the docs. I should have this figured out by now.” Years ago, a colleague asked Albert Einstein if he knew his phone number. [Read More]

My KubeCon + CloudNativeCon NA 2018 Recap

I went to KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2018 in Seattle, Washington this week. My trip was cut short due to a work meeting in Raleigh, NC. But, I definitely pushed myself to my limits in Seattle. Make no mistake, had I been staying the entire week as planned I would not have done the time on site the way I did. I wore quite a few hats on this trip: [Read More]

Kubernetes: Cron Jobs

One of the reasons I stood up a Kubernetes cluster on Raspberry Pis in my house was because of the savings I wanted to gain by not running high-available, redundant infrastructure in the cloud. Kubernetes provides high-availability by design. It’s pretty awesome the possibilities that exist given this capability. Need a web server to constantly run? Build a container and throw it in the Kubernetes cluster. Need a service available all the time? [Read More]

Raspberry Pi Kubernetes Cluster

For many months, I have wanted a Kubernetes cluster of my very own. One that I can tinker with, break, rebuild, and deploy services to. In the fall of 2017, I decided to stand up a three node cluster in Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE). It was nice and shiny and Googly but it wasn’t cheap. Totaling almost $40/month to run I was envious of my friends who have virtually unlimited access to cloud compute. [Read More]

Kubernetes: Getting Started

Getting Started with Kubernetes sounds like quite a daunting feat. How do you get started with “an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications”? Let’s examine Kubernetes’ beginning. Containers have been in use for a very long time in the Unix world. Linux containers are popular thanks to projects like Docker. Google created Process Containers in 2006 and later realized they needed a way to maintain all these containers. [Read More]